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Keep E-mail Newsletters in Your Marketing Plan

Are you tempted to eliminate your e-mail newsletter from your marketing plan? If so, you are one of the growing number of authors considering the same thing. Before you stop your newsletter, let us explain why keeping it is a good idea.

marketing for authors

 

Social Media Versus E-mail Newsletters

If you are a pro at using social media, e-mail may seem passé. Although a Facebook post instantly goes out to everyone, however, it can quickly get lost in a reader’s ever-changing news feed. E-mail newsletters are a more personal—and direct—form of communication. They contain a plethora of information about an author and upcoming book events. Rather than eliciting a spontaneous reaction, they convey all the information your readers need.

 

The Makings of a Successful Newsletter

A good newsletter promotes your brand as well as informs fans of upcoming events. It gives you the opportunity to speak directly to your core readers, so make sure you convey the right message. Plan your design and content carefully. Determine a distribution schedule you can maintain easily.

 

Must-Haves of a Successful Newsletter

  • Topical news and upcoming event announcements
  • Personal stories that help you connect with readers
  • Reports on the progress of your next book
  • Mentions of awards and articles
  • An invitation for readers to share the newsletter with others
  • Up-to-date contact information, such as website URL and e-mail addresses where readers can send feedback

 

He Who Lives by Social Media Alone…

When sending out last-minute event notices, don’t assume everyone is only on Facebook or Twitter. Use newsletters to reach out to individuals who aren’t using social media. Some readers may have signed up for your mailing list at a book event. If they haven’t visited your website or followed your Facebook page, e-mail may be the only way to reach them.

 

All About Focus and Control

You want your marketing efforts to be focused on the right audience. With an e-mail newsletter, you control who gets your message. Facebook ads, in contrast, use Facebook members’ preferences and selected keywords to determine target audiences. The right parameters must be chosen for your ad to be effective. Newsletters take the guesswork out of your marketing; You know the individuals are interested in your books because they signed up to receive your e-mails.

marketing for indie authors

E-mail Newsletters Made Easy

It does take time to produce an e-mail newsletter. Online services such as AWeber and MailChimp make it easier. They organize, format, and send your messages out to thousands of lucky fans in a snap. These programs even compile statistics on whether your e-mails are being opened and read.

 

Keep Sending out Those Newsletters

E-mail newsletters and mailing lists remain highly effective, proven tools to include in your marketing arsenal. Together with social media, they can successfully promote your brand and increase book sales, so take the time to craft your newsletters and answer readers’ questions. Reaching your core audience on a personal level will never go out of fashion. Keep sending out those newsletters; they are working!

 

Why Dog Ear?

Determining the best way to market your book can be a mystery to indie authors. Experts to guide you in developing a solid marketing strategy are an invaluable resource. With over 50 years of traditional publishing experience, Dog Ear Publishing knows what it takes to promote authors and their books. Our team of experienced editors, proofreaders, and designers can help refine your work into a top-notch finished publication. If you want your book to be a quality reflection of who you are as an author, visit our website at www.dogearpublishing.net today and take control of your publishing destiny.

Ray Robinson
Ray Robinson

When Ray first entered the publishing industry, authors relied on “vanity presses” to produce their work – many of whom would charge $15,000 or more and leave the author’s garage filled with hundreds of books. Ray, along with coworker Alan Harris, joined forces with Miles Nelson to create Dog Ear Publishing to provide the author community a self-publisher with a heart. The group’s application of new technologies and publishing on demand reduced the cost of publishing a book to a fraction of what it had been for previous generations; authors now have the ability to publish a book in as little as six weeks and print as few as a single copy.